Wednesday, 6 January 2021

Breastfeeding: 6 Things Nursing Moms Should Know About Dental Health

Breastfeeding is one of the first (and most personal) decisions a mother makes for her baby. It can help your baby’s body fight infections and reduce health risks like asthma, ear infections, SIDS and obesity in children. Nursing moms may lower their chances of developing breast and ovarian cancer. But did you know breastfeeding can impact the dental health of both baby and mom? Here’s how:

Breastfeeding May Help Build a Better Bite
Several recent studies, one in Pediatrics in 2015 and one in the August 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, found that babies who were exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months were less likely to have teeth alignment issues such as open bites, crossbites, and overbites, than those exclusively breast fed for shorter lengths of time or not at all.

Still, this doesn’t mean your exclusively breastfed baby won’t need braces someday. Other factors, including genetics, pacifier use, and thumbsucking, affect alignment. “Every baby, every child is different,” says Dr. Ruchi Sahota, mother and American Dental Association spokesperson. “The best thing for mom to do is to take the child to the dentist and make sure the dentist is able to monitor eruption, that baby teeth are coming out at the right time and permanent teeth are coming in at the right time.”
 
You Don’t Have to Wean When Your Baby Gets Teeth
It’s a question that often pops up in parenting message boards and conversations with new moms: Should I stop breastfeeding when my baby starts teething? The answer is not if you don’t want to. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding for the first year of a baby’s life; the World Health Organization encourages moms to go for two. “As it goes with breastfeeding, every child is different, every mother is different,” Dr. Sahota says. “You should stop breastfeeding when you think it’s the best for you and the baby but not just because the teeth come in.” 

Breastfeeding Reduces the Risk for Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
Another benefit of exclusive breastfeeding, Dr. Sahota says, is a reduced risk of baby bottle tooth decay, the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar. This type of tooth decay often occurs when a baby is put to bed with a bottle – even ones containing formula, milk or fruit juice. (Water is fine because the teeth won’t be bathed in sugary liquids for a prolonged time.) It most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected. 

Breastfed Babies Can Still Get Cavities
It’s one of the most common questions nursing mothers ask: Can breastfeeding cause cavities? Yes, it can. Although natural, breast milk, just like formula, contains sugar. That is why, breastfed or bottlefed, it’s important to care for your baby’s teeth from the start. A few days after birth, begin wiping your baby’s gums with a clean, moist gauze pad or washcloth every day. Then, brush her teeth twice a day as soon as that first tooth emerges. Use fluoride toothpaste in an amount no more than a smear or the size of a grain of rice.

Need Dental Work Done? Double Check Your Medications    
If you need to have a dental procedure that requires medication while nursing, check with your dentist, personal physician and pediatrician to make sure it is safe for baby. “It’s important to know there are antibiotics we can give you that won’t hurt the baby,” Dr. Sahota says. “It’s not only safe to go to the dentist while you’re pregnant and while you’re nursing, it’s very important to do so for the best health of your child.” 

Another helpful resource for nursing moms is the U.S National Library of Medicine’s Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed). Simply search for any medication and get information about how it affects your supply, your baby and if there’s an alternative available. Talk to your doctor about what you find. 

Mom, Take Care of Yourself
Dr. Sahota says there’s one thing she sees in new moms, breastfeeding or not. “I definitely see moms who are, as simple as it sounds, are not able to take care of themselves as well as they did before the baby,” she says. “Moms that are just not brushing as much as they used to, whether they’re brushing once a day or not brushing at all.” 

A dip in dental care could lead to more gum disease and cavities. Cavity prevention is especially crucial for moms, as even the simple act of sharing a spoon with could transfer that bacteria into your baby’s mouth. “It’s really important to do the basics: Brush twice a day, floss once a day. See your ADA dentist regularly,” she says. “Make sure you have prevented decay and don’t have any cavities so you don’t transfer that to your baby.”

Dr. Sahota says she also sees more teeth grinding (bruxism) in moms. “I see a lot more head and neck muscle tension, which causes our jaws to be a little bit more tense and then that causes us to grind our teeth,” she says. “Trouble sleeping when we’re pregnant, that can cause us to grind our teeth a little bit. Postnatally, stress can increase and it can also be an issue.”

All moms need to stay hydrated, especially if breastfeeding. “Not drinking enough water, that in itself is a very dangerous thing for your mouth,” she says. “If we have a dry mouth, we put ourselves at risk for gum disease, for cavities, so many things.”

And there’s one last piece of advice Dr. Sahota gives all moms. “Just like if you’re on an airplane, you have to put your oxygen mask on first before you put it on your child,” she says. “If you’re not healthy, you will not have the time and the energy to make sure your children are also healthy.”

The above article is from mouthhealthy.org

Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Thursday, 24 December 2020

Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Prosthetic Joints and Orthopedic Implants

If you have had a joint replacement and taken antibiotics before dental work in the past, you may not need to make a trip to the pharmacy before your next procedure. The American Dental Association has found it is no longer necessary for most dental patients with orthopedic implants to have antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infection.

What Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis?
Antibiotic prophylaxis (or premedication) is simply the taking of antibiotics before some dental procedures such as teeth cleaning, tooth extractions, root canals, and deep cleaning between the tooth root and gums to prevent infection. We all have bacteria in our mouths, and a number of dental treatments—and even daily routines like chewing, brushing or flossing—can allow bacteria to enter the bloodstream (bacteremia). For most of us, this isn’t a problem. A healthy immune system prevents these bacteria from causing any harm. There is concern, however, that bacteria in the bloodstream could cause infection elsewhere in the body.

Prior to 2012, premedication prior to dental procedures was common for joint replacement patients, even though there was little evidence to support the practice and experts recommended against its practice for most dental patients. In 2012, the American Dental Association and American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons published updated guidelines, stating that dentists “might consider discontinuing the practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotics”. In January 2015, the ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs issued another guideline, which continued to discourage prophylactic antibiotic use for most patients with prosthetic joint implants. Guidelines are re-evaluated every few years to make sure that they are based on the best scientific evidence.

Why Don’t I Need Antibiotic Prophylaxis? 
Based on careful review of the scientific literature, the ADA found that dental procedures are not associated with prosthetic joint implant infections, and that antibiotics given before dental procedures do not prevent such infections.

In fact, for most people, the known risks of taking antibiotics may outweigh the uncertain benefits. Risks related to antibiotic use include nausea, upset stomach and allergic reactions, including anaphylactic shock (a severe allergic reaction that can be life threatening). Other risks include developing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, which can complicate treatment of infections such as strep throat, pink eye and meningitis; as well as increasing the risk of C. difficile infection, which causes diarrhea and other intestinal problems. Patients over 70 years old are also at increased risk of experiencing adverse  reactions to some antibiotics. 

Who Can Antibiotic Prophylaxis Help?
Depending on your personal medical history, you may still be a candidate for premedication. For example, antibiotic prophylaxis might be useful for patients undergoing dental procedures who also have compromised immune systems (due to, for instance, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, chemotherapy, and chronic steroid use), which increases the risk of orthopedic implant infection. It may also benefit others with heart conditions. Always talk with your dentist or physician about whether antibiotic prophylaxis before dental treatment is right for you.

The above article is from mouthhealthy.org

Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Tuesday, 15 December 2020

Ketosis Breath: When Your Diet Affects Your Oral Health

The ketogenic diet has created buzz in the health community and for good reason. Many have found success in restricting their carb intake so that the body burns fat instead of glucose to lose weight. If you're following a keto diet, you might notice some unpleasant side effects that accompany the positive changes on the scale. For example, so-called ketosis breath is a common complaint. Understanding keto breath is the first step to ensuring your diet doesn't impair your oral health.

Ketosis and Your Breath
If a lower-carb lifestyle is supposedly healthy, then why does it result in foul-smelling breath? The answer is in how your body breaks down fats. After swapping a typical carb-heavy diet for one that promotes fats and protein, your body goes into ketosis. As the University of California, San Francisco explains, ketosis is a process wherein your body begins to burn fat for energy, since glucose stores (your body's preferred source of energy) aren't readily available. While in ketosis, your body converts fat cells into three types of ketones, which are fat byproducts. One of these ketones, called acetone, is essentially unusable for your body's energy stores. 

Therefore, your body releases it via your urine and lungs, notes Medscape. It's acetone that gives your breath that distinctive "ketosis" smell, which, according to Medline Plus, can be compared to an overly sweet, fruity scent.

Keto Diet and Oral Health
When swapping carbs for healthy fats and proteins, your body undergoes several changes. While ketosis breath is often associated with a low-carb lifestyle, the diet may also have a positive effect on your oral health. After all, in avoiding carbs, you're also avoiding processed sugars, which the American Dental Association counts among the worst foods for oral health. Because oral bacteria thrive on sugar, reducing your sugar intake may reduce cavities.

A low-carb diet may also help reduce inflammation. A study in BMC Oral Health found that a diet low in carbohydrates and high in omega-3 fatty acids resulted in lower rates of gingivitis and inflammation in patients. So while going low-carb may make your breath smell, it may actually help improve your overall oral health.

Freshening Up
If you've noticed that you have keto breath and you still want to continue your keto diet, consider some of these methods to deal with the smell:
  • Chew sugar-free gum to help stimulate saliva and freshen your breath.
  • Adjust your intake of complex carbohydrates, such as leafy green vegetables and whole grains, while continuing to avoid refined carbs.
  • Fill a water bottle and sip throughout the day.
  • Continue good oral health habits. A keto lifestyle, while beneficial for oral health, is not a substitute for daily brushing and flossing.
  • Add fresh herbs to water and tea. Herbs such as clove, cinnamon, mint and fennel are natural breath fresheners.
Starting and continuing a ketogenic lifestyle should only ever be done with the supervision and approval of a qualified health care professional. While it's true that a keto diet may offer benefits for oral health, it has a few drawbacks as well. By addressing some of the roadblocks, you can make sure that your keto diet is as healthy as it is successful. To keep you on track, lessen the smelly side effects by brushing with Colgate Total Fresh Mint Stripe Gel toothpaste. It has a minty blend of gel and paste that leaves your mouth clean and fresh. 

The above article is from colgate.com

Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Sunday, 6 December 2020

Teeth Stains: Causes, Types, and How to Remove Teeth Stains

Teeth stain for many reasons, including your food and drink choices, oral hygiene, and medication use. Teeth stains occur on the surface of the tooth or below the tooth enamel and some people develop both types of teeth stains. 
 
Types of Tooth Discoloration (Stains)

Tooth discoloration can occur as a result of surface stains, due to actual changes in your tooth material, or because of a combination of both factors. Dental professionals have identified three main categories of tooth discoloration: 
  • Extrinsic sTeeth Stains: An extrinsic tooth stain is staining on the surface of the tooth. It occurs when stain particles, such as pigmented residue from food or drink, build-up in the film of protein that covers the tooth enamel. Extrinsic tooth stains are typically caused by tobacco use or by regularly drinking coffee and tea, wine or cola drinks. This type of tooth stain responds well to regular dental cleaning and brushing the teeth with whitening toothpaste.
  • Intrinsic Teeth Stains: An intrinsic tooth stain is staining below the surface of the tooth. It occurs when stain-causing particles work through the exterior of the tooth and accumulate within the tooth enamel. Excessive fluoride use and  also have been associated with intrinsic, especially in children. An intrinsic tooth stain is trickier to remove, but it can be done. An intrinsic tooth stain may require bleaching using professional or at-home chemical teeth-whitening products, such as Whitestrips.
  • Age-Related Teeth Stains: Age-related teeth stains combine the results of both intrinsic and extrinsic tooth discoloration. Because the core tissue of your teeth, the dentin, naturally yellows over time, teeth discolor with age. As we age, the enamel that covers the tooth becomes thinner, allowing the dentin to show through. These intrinsic causes of discoloration combined with extrinsic causes such as the effects of certain foods, beverages, and tobacco, will cause most adults' teeth to discolor with age.
Stained Teeth Causes

Teeth stains have many causes. Certain foods and drinks can cause teeth stains, and as we’ve talked about, tooth discoloration is also a product of several biological factors, including the transparency of your tooth enamel.

There are many causes of discolored teeth—some of which could have possibly been prevented, and many of which are beyond your control. This comprehensive list can help you determine the cause of discolored teeth, and in many cases, help prevent further discoloring of your teeth:
  • Food & Drink: Coffee, tea, dark sodas, red wine, and even a few fruits and vegetables are proven causes of discolored teeth.
  • Tobacco: Both cigarettes and chewing tobacco can contribute to discolored teeth.
  • Oral Care: Poor dental hygiene, such as inadequate brushing or flossing, can lead to tooth discoloration.
  • Trauma or Disease: Any trauma, illness, or disease that affects enamel development in children—either in the womb or while teeth are developing (under the age of 8)—can cause discolored teeth. Trauma to adult teeth can also cause discolored teeth. In addition, there are a few diseases and disease treatments that can cause discolored teeth. Chemotherapy and radiation, for example, discolor teeth.
  • Medical Treatments: Sometimes medical treatments can contribute to teeth stain, and several classes of medications including high blood pressure medications, chemotherapy, antihistamines and some antipsychotic medications can cause teeth stains.
To know how to remove a tooth stain, it helps to know what type of stain you are dealing with. Paul A. Sagel, a Procter & Gamble Research Fellow, has conducted extensive research into the science of tooth stains. Research by Sagel and others have shown that some stain particles remain on the tooth enamel, while others work through the tooth enamel over time and set beneath the tooth surface, which creates dullness and tooth stain.

Are My Teeth White?

Tooth color is subjective, and it can be hard to tell how well teeth-whitening products are working to remove or reduce teeth stains. A 2004 study in the Journal of Dentistry showed that even professionals disagree on tooth color when evaluating the same teeth, and a single professional can rate the whiteness of the same tooth differently on different occasions. One method of evaluating the effectiveness of whitening products involves taking high-resolution digital images of teeth and assigning numerical values to describe the whitening effects three ways: a decrease in yellowness, decrease in redness, and an increase in lightness.

Teeth Whitening for Older Adults

While everyone knows you get better with age, tooth stains are one of the least-favorite body changes that take place during the aging process. In fact, one of the three main categories of tooth discoloration is age-related discoloration, which is a result of several factors.

Why Are Seniors Susceptible For Tooth Stains?

First, as you age, the outer layer of the tooth’s enamel gets thinner over time, revealing the natural yellow color of the core tissue of your teeth, called the dentin. This dentin also yellows naturally with age. In addition, years of drinking tea, coffee, dark sodas, and wine can cause progressive tooth stains over time. Finally, damage or injuries to your teeth, which occur over time throughout your life, cause discoloration that can become noticeable with age.

How to Remove Teeth Stains

Fortunately, there are many treatment options for teeth stains. Keep your teeth healthy and looking great by maintaining a consistent oral health routine including twice-daily toothbrushing and daily flossing, twice-yearly visits to your dentist, and by limiting your consumption of teeth-staining beverages. Regular whitening maintenance will help keep them looking whiter and brighter.
 
Regardless of the type of tooth discoloration you have, there are many safe, over-the-counter,  teeth-whitening products available to help you makeover your discolored teeth into a beautiful white smile. Ask your dentist for recommendations on the best teeth whitening option to treat your age-related tooth stains and discoloration.
 
The above article is from crest.com

Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Tuesday, 24 November 2020

Types of Mouth Viruses and Bacteria

Mouth bacteria and viruses can lead to a number of oral health issues if not treated properly. Tooth decay, gum disease, and mouth sores are only a few of the conditions that may occur when an infection takes root. Learn more about the different viral and bacterial infections that may affect your tongue and mouth and what you can do to prevent them.

Common Bacterial and Viral Mouth Infections 
Bacterial and viral infections on the tongue and mouth are relatively common, and in most cases can be taken care of with proper diagnosis and treatment. Several infections that may affect the mouth and tongue include:
  • Tonsil Stones – Also known as Tonsilloliths, are bacterial infections that affect your tonsils. 
  • White Tongue – A condition where the lingual papillae on the tongue swell up and trap bacteria and food debris. 
  • Oral Thrush – A fungal infection affecting the tongue and throat. 
  • Coxsackie Virus – Most common in children, this mouth virus can cause painful blisters. 
  • Strawberry Tongue Virus - Not a condition on its own but it can be a sign of a more serious underlying disorder. 
  • Herpangina Virus – Another strain of the Coxsackie Virus, this mouth virus causes painful, red ulcers to form inside the mouth. 
What are Tonsil Stones?
Tonsils are the gland-like structures located in the back of your throat. Their main role is to help support your immune system by keeping any viral and bacterial infections from entering into your throat. However, this may not be case for some people. 

Tonsil stones occur when bacteria and other debris combine together and get stuck in the nooks of the tonsils. If the trapped debris hardens, it turns into tonsil stones. 

Common symptoms of tonsil stones include:
  • Inflammation or swelling of the tonsil
  • Sore throat
  • Painful swallowing
  • Persistent cough caused by the irritation from the stone
  • Pain in the ear because of the nerve pathways involved
  • White-like debris at the back of the throat 
  • Bad breath caused by the sulfur gases which get trapped in the tonsils
In most cases, tonsil stones may be able to go away on their own. However, in instances where the stone has grown too large, medical treatment may be necessary:
  • Surgery may be required to remove the stones
  • More severe or persistent cases may require surgical removal of the tonsils themselves, this is known as a Tonsillectomy
  • Antibiotics to lessen the infection 
  • Saltwater rinse for smaller tonsil stones
You can help prevent tonsil stones from forming by following a thorough oral care routine. The more bacteria you remove from your mouth, the less can get trapped in the tonsils. Regular brushing and flossing and rinsing with mouthwash after meals can remove the bacteria and debris that may lead to tonsil stones. 

For people with chronic tonsil stones, it is often best to have the tonsils removed surgically to prevent the infection.

What is White Tongue? 
White tongue is a condition that causes the tongue to take on a white-like hue. Lingual papillae are the small structures on the tongue’s surface that give your tongue it’s rough texture. When the papillae swell up they can trap more bacteria and debris, resulting in an appearance. 

One of the more common causes of white tongue is a lack of oral hygiene, other causes may include:
  • Dehydration or dry mouth, a lack of moisture in the mouth can promote bacteria
  • Smoking or alcohol use which can dry out and irritate the mouth
  • Mouth irritations caused by braces or dentures
The best way to prevent white patches from forming on your tongue is to maintain a consistent oral care routine. Twice daily brushing and flossing at least once can help remove bacteria and keep the mouth clean. Rinsing with an alcohol-free mouthwash can further reduce the amount of debris in the mouth and promote a healthy tongue. To further remove bacteria on the tongue, a tongue scraper can help. Some toothbrushes come with a tongue cleaning feature to easily incorporate the step into your daily oral hygiene routine. 

What is Oral Thrush?
Candida is a fungal organism that’s normally occurring in the mouth, however, if it overgrows it can cause a condition known as oral thrush. The most common symptom of oral thrush is the spread of white lesions on the tongue, cheeks, palette, tonsils, gums, and back of the throat. These lesions can be cottage cheese-like in appearance and may bleed when irritated. The lesions can be painful and turn red, making it difficult to swallow or eat. 

Usually people with weakened immune systems are most prone to oral thrush. Maintaining a healthy diet, regular checkups with your doctor and dental professional, and a thorough oral care routine can help prevent the fungal infection from spreading. 

To further reduce your risk of contracting a candida infection be sure to:
  • Brush your teeth at least two times a day 
  • Floss a minimum of once a day
  • Rinse with an alcohol-free mouthwash 
  • Limit your sugar intake
  • Clean your dentures daily if you wear them
Your doctor or dental professional may recommend a form of antifungal medication to treat a candida infection. It’s important to see your healthcare provider if you suspect oral thrush. Early treatment can help reduce the chances of the infection spreading from the mouth into the throat, which can lead to more serious health complications. 

What is Foot and Mouth Virus?
Hand, foot, and mouth disease, also known as Coxsackie Virus, often affects children under the age of 10. The viral infection causes a rash of blisters to form in and around the mouth, feet, and hands. These blisters are often accompanied by a runny nose, sore throat, fever, and poor appetite. 

The infection usually goes away on its own after about a week or so, and can be treated with proper oral hydration. A good oral hygiene routine can help, along with plenty of handwashing to help limit the spread. 

What is Strawberry Tongue?
Strawberry tongue on its own is not a condition, but rather a symptom of an underlying condition or disease. The term “strawberry tongue” refers specifically to the tongue’s appearance—red, bumpy, and swollen. Strawberry tongue is often characterized by enlarged taste buds and an overly rough texture. 

Conditions that can cause strawberry tongue include:
  • Allergies from foods or drugs
  • Scarlet Fever a bacterial infection as a result of strep throat
  • Kawasaki Disease which causes inflamed arteries, mostly affecting children
  • Vitamin B deficiencies 
  • Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) a life-threatening infection that requires immediate medical attention
It’s important to see your medical professional to diagnose the cause of your strawberry tongue for proper treatment. In some cases, strawberry tongue may be a part of a serious health problem and can lead to complications on your overall health. 

What is Herpangina? 
The herpangina virus is very similar to foot and mouth disease. The viral infection tends to affect children more often than adults and results in small blisters or ulcers along the top of the mouth and back of the throat. 
Common symptoms of herpangina include:
  • Neck pain
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fever
  • Headache 
  • Difficulty swallowing 
Additionally, infants with the herpangina virus may experience bouts of excessive drooling and vomiting. Since herpangina is viral and not bacterial, antibiotics will not work as treatment. Rather, your medical professional will determine which course of treatment is best based on age and severity of symptoms, though pain management is often a requirement. 

Though mouthwash can’t treat viral infections, it can help soothe mouth sores by flushing out plaque bacteria. Alcohol-free rinses like Crest Pro-Health Advanced Multi-Protection Mouthwash can help promote a cleaner mouth by removing more food and plaque bacteria from the mouth without causing extra irritation—however, it is not recommended for children under 6. 

A therapeutic rinse composed of salt and warm water is based for children. The rinse can help to safely relieve some of the pain caused by the infection in the mouth and throat. 

In addition to a rinse, plenty of hydration is often recommended for recovery. It is also best to keep away from overly hot or acidic drinks as they can irritate the ulcers and cause symptoms to worsen. 

Herpangina usually lasts for about a week but if symptoms persist it is crucial to see your doctor right away. 

Preventing Spread of Bacterial Infections
A good hygiene routine is best when it comes to the prevention of bacterial oral infections. 
  • Wash hands thoroughly 
  • Brush teeth at least twice a day or after meals to remove more plaque bacteria from the teeth, gums, and tongue
  • Switch to an electric toothbrush to ensure a more complete clean, the unique round brush heads on Oral-B electric toothbrushes surround each tooth for 100% more plaque removal than a manual
  • Use a fluoride toothpaste like Crest Pro-Health which neutralizes plaque bacteria for all day protection
  • Floss daily to get rid of any trapped food that can lead to bacterial growth in the mouth
  • Rinse with an alcohol-free mouthwash to get rid of bacteria and keep the mouth clean
  • See your dental professional every six months for professional cleanings and checkups
Viral and bacterial mouth infections can affect your oral health as well as your overall health. Be sure to maintain a thorough routine to keep your smile healthy and see your medical professional in the event where symptoms are cause for concern. 

The above article is from crest.com

Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Sunday, 15 November 2020

Why You Might Want A Tooth Bridge Over Implants

If you have one or more missing teeth, it can be easy to develop oral health problems beyond tooth decay, such as speech impediments and even periodontal disease. A tooth bridge, also known as a dental bridge, provides the support you need to prevent surrounding teeth from loosening or moving out of their correct positions. But what is a bridge, and how does it differ from a tooth implant?

What Is a Dental Bridge?

A bridge is a fixed appliance fitted into the mouth to fill the gap caused by missing teeth, according to the Academy of Osseointegration. This bridge is cemented to the "abutment teeth" on either side of the gap, providing an anchor so that it can be attached to either your natural teeth or the crowns fitted over them. Your dentist places artificial "pontic teeth" onto the bridge, in the space between the abutment teeth.

How They Differ from Implants

Implants are posts made from screws or cylinders, inserted surgically through your gum into the jawbone. Prosthetic teeth are then mounted individually on each of these posts, explains the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), to take the place of natural teeth and prevent the problems commonly associated with dental gaps. Keep in mind fitting implants is a much more complex procedure that requires surgical training. If your teeth are in excellent condition, then you won't have to worry about placing crowns or fitting a bridge to them.

Reasons You Might Need a Tooth Bridge
Gaps of any size between your teeth can cause problems. For example:
The adjacent teeth begin to loosen, which causes them to shift out of their correct positions.
Loose teeth in children may complicate the eruption of permanent teeth, encouraging them to come through improperly.

Gaps and movement in teeth can affect your bite, according to Edward A Chipps, DDS, creating issues for your jaw and hindering your ability to speak and chew.

In the long term, a lack of dental support can cause other health issues as well, such as head- or earaches, as well as nose and throat irritation. This makes it important for patients to replace missing teeth as early as possible, rather than waiting to see whether problems go away on their own.

Types of Bridges

Different types of tooth bridges require different methods of fitting. Traditional bridges are typically made from porcelain or ceramic, and are fused to metal abutments. A cantilever bridge is supported on only one side of the gap. A bonded bridge is made from metal, and carries clips resembling wings on either side which are bonded to the back of the abutment teeth. This method often costs less than traditional bridges because the abutments don't always require crowns to cover them, but it may also be less secure than a traditional bridge.

Caring for Your Tooth Bridge

Good oral hygiene is important at any time, but when you're wearing a fixed appliance such as a dental bridge, it's even more crucial. Caring for your bridge appropriately gives it a lifespan of up to 10 years, according to the Canadian Dental Association. Just as you need to brush natural teeth daily using an appropriate toothbrush like the Colgate® 360°® Toothbrush, which has multi-level bristles to remove more plaque in between teeth, you also need to clean your bridgework thoroughly and use dental floss between each tooth.
 
Taking care of your bridge means taking care of your oral health. With this routine, you'll have the smile you want for as long as possible.

The above article is from colgate.com

Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Friday, 6 November 2020

Halloween Candy: Your Dental Health Survival Guide

With Halloween comes ghosts, goblins and goodies—and the sugar in those treats can play some unwanted tricks on your teeth if you’re not careful. 

Here’s why: The bacteria in your mouth are probably more excited to eat Halloween candy than you are. When the bacteria eat the sugar and leftover food in your mouth, a weak acid is produced. That acid is what can contribute to cavities. 

But don’t hang up your costume just yet. “Halloween is about candy, dressing up and having fun,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween as a splurge as long as you’re brushing twice a day and flossing once a day all year long.”

To help you sort through the trick-or-treat bag loot, we have a rundown of some common candies and their impact on your teeth:

Chocolate
Chocolate is probably your best bet, which is good because it’s also one of the most popular kinds of candy handed out on Halloween. “Chocolate is one of the better candies because it washes off your teeth easier than other types of candy,” Dr. Ferraz- Dougherty says. “Dark chocolate also has less sugar than milk chocolate.”

Sticky and Gummy Candies
Be picky if it’s sticky. These are some of the worst candies for your teeth. “This candy is harder to remove and may stay longer on your teeth, which gives that cavity-causing bacteria more time to work,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

Hard Candy
Hard candies are also ones to watch on Halloween. “They can actually break your teeth if you’re not careful,” Dr. Ferraz- Dougherty says. “You also tend to keep these kinds of candies in your mouth for longer periods of time so the sugar is getting in your saliva and washing over your teeth.”

Sour Candy
You might want to pass on things that make you pucker – especially if they are sticky and coated in sugar. “Sour candy can be very acidic,” says Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty. “And that acidity can weaken and damage the hard outer shell of your teeth, making your teeth more vulnerable to cavities.”

Popcorn Balls
Have some floss handy if you’re enjoying one of these fall favorites. “Kernels can get stuck in-between your teeth," Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says. "They are also sticky, sugary and can be hard.”

The above article is from mouthhealthy.org

Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com