Wednesday, 28 March 2018

The Top 7 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer (Part 2 of 3)

You know your dentist is looking for cavities during regular check-ups, but you may not realize your dentist can check for cancer at the same time. Itís estimated that approximately 51,540 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue in 2018.

Tobacco 
Whether you smoke it or chew it, tobacco use increases your risk dramatically. Smoking can cause oral cancer, as well as cancer in other parts of the body. Pipe smokers are also at a higher risk for developing cancer in their lips. Smokeless tobacco, like chew, can lead to many issues in your mouth, the most serious being cancer of the cheeks, gums, and lips.











Alcohol 
According to the American Cancer Society, 7 of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers. Heavy drinking, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is an average of two drinks a day or more for men and an average of more than one drink a day for women. If you are a heavy drinker and a heavy smoker, your chances of developing oral cancer increase significantly.  











Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) 
The sexually transmitted disease is now associated with about 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer (specifically those occurring at the back of the tongue, in or around the tonsils) diagnosed each year in the United States, according to the CDC. People who are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer tend to be younger and nonsmokers. People with HPV-positive cancers have a lower risk of death or recurrence, even though these cancers are often diagnosed at a later stage because it develops in difficult-to-detect areas.  











To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Tuesday, 27 March 2018

Treatment of Abscessed Teeth

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about the treatment of abscessed teeth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Friday, 23 March 2018

Teeth Whitening Dentist

Teeth Whitening – Dazzling Results in Just One Visit!

Professional-strength whitening is the only surefire way to get your teeth their truest white, which is why Dr. de Bruin utilizes Philips ZOOM!™ whitening. You may have seen this product on television. With just one application, you can experience brilliantly white teeth, without blemishes or discoloration. And the results can last for years!
If you need only moderate whitening, we also offer custom whitening trays made in our own lab. After the initial visit, you will receive supplies and instructions to finish the process at home. This technique is safe and effective. Results become visible in 1 - 14 days.
de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Wednesday, 21 March 2018

The Top 7 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer (Part 1 of 3)

You know your dentist is looking for cavities during regular check-ups, but you may not realize your dentist can check for cancer at the same time. Itís estimated that approximately 51,540 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue in 2018.

Regular visits to your dentist can help you detect such cancers early, and changing a few potentially harmful habits may help reduce your chances of developing them. Read on to find out the top risk factors.
 










Gender 
Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer. The American Cancer Society attributes this to higher rates of alcohol and tobacco use by men, but says more men of a younger age are being diagnosed with HPV-related forms of oral cancer.
 










Age 
Most people who are diagnosed with oral cancer are 55 or older, according to the American Cancer Society. HPV-related oral cancers, however, are often diagnosed in people who are younger.  












To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Tuesday, 20 March 2018

The Importance of Brushing and Flossing

Learn what the American Dental Association has to about the importance of brushing and flossing daily.

 
The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Friday, 16 March 2018

Dental Digital Xrays

75% Reduction in Radiation

Dr. de Bruin works with the cutting edge in X-ray technology. Digital images of your mouth are captured by inserting a special sensor. The results are then downloaded straight into our computer. We can also see your complete mouth as one image, including the upper and lower jaws, using our panoramic digital X-ray machine. This way Dr. de Bruin can immediately begin gauging the current state of your oral health, starting with the bone structure. Plus, all the data can be conveniently stored and later overlaid with more current X-rays to make your treatment advances more apparent, along with overall changes to your dental health. Not only do these techniques permit us more options than conventional X-rays, but they do it all while subjecting you to 75% less radiation than traditional captures and using no harmful developing chemicals.

de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Tuesday, 13 March 2018

Wisdom Teeth

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about wisdom teeth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com

Friday, 9 March 2018

Gum Disease Linked to Heart Disease

Gum Disease Can Contribute to Heart Disease and Even Stroke

Medical research has disclosed a startling truth: gum disease, stroke, and heart disease are connected. Since heart disease is typically fatal, clearly gum disease warrants serious concern. The American Dental Association has stated that 80 percent of all Americans have periodontal (gum) disease. If this were any other illness, such as AIDS or tuberculosis, it would be proclaimed as an epidemic! Most dentists believe this should be the case, but they also realize that gum disease has never be labeled as an epidemic because "no one ever dies from it." The worst is that you lose your teeth. Not ideal – but certainly not life threatening. But that mind-set is changing.
The American Academy of Periodontology released the following statement: "Studies found periodontal infection may contribute to the development of heart disease, increase the risk of premature, underweight births, and pose a serious threat to people whose health is already compromised due to diabetes and respiratory diseases." Periodontal disease is attributed to a bacterial infection of the gums. These bacteria inhabit your soft tissue and slide right into your bloodstream – straight to your heart.
de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS  
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A 
Reno, NV 89511  
(775) 826-1838  
deBruinSmiles.com

Saturday, 3 March 2018

Nutrition: What You Eat Affects Your Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Your mouth, teeth, and gums are more than just tools for eating. They’re essential for chewing and swallowing-the first steps in the digestion process. Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also that of your teeth and gums. In fact, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth. Here are a few helpful things to know about how what you eat can impact your dental health.

Diet and Tooth Decay
The foods you eat and the beverages you drink can have a direct influence on the incidence and progression of tooth decay, depending upon: 

  • The form of the food-whether it’s liquid, solid, sticky or slow to dissolve makes a difference. 
  • How often you eat sugary foods and beverages and how often you eat or drink acidic foods and beverages. 
  • The nutritional makeup of the food. 
  • The combination of the foods you eat and the order in which you eat them. 
  • Medical conditions you may have, such as gastrointestinal reflux and eating disorders, which can increase risk of cavities and weaken teeth.

How Snacking Affects Your Dental Health
For dental health, it’s recommended that people limit eating and drinking between meals. Of course, sometimes eating between meals must happen. Unfortunately, most people choose foods like sweets and chips for snacks; foods that harm teeth by promoting tooth decay. If you do snack, make it a nutritious choice-such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, vegetables or nuts-for your overall health and the health of your teeth. Did you know that certain foods can put you at risk for cavities and other dental health problems? Here are some MouthHealthy tips.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Recommended Nutritional Guidelines
  • Foods That Harm Your Dental Health
  • Sugar and Your Dental Health
  • How Sugar Substitutes Affect Your Teeth
  • 4 Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Cavities

de Bruin Dental Center   
Tomas G. de Bruin, DDS   
631 Sierra Rose Drive, Suite A  
Reno, NV 89511   
(775) 826-1838   
deBruinSmiles.com